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posts tagged "black panthers"

seandonovan:

fearlesslyraw:

….like…yo…what are clothes?

hahahahaha wait this is like the third thing on tumblr I’ve seen this week of someone being sexually frustrated over Huey Newton. Hahahaha whatever I support it.

There is nothing more dazzling than fearless and revoltionariy minds. 

seandonovan:

fearlesslyraw:

….like…yo…what are clothes?

hahahahaha wait this is like the third thing on tumblr I’ve seen this week of someone being sexually frustrated over Huey Newton. Hahahaha whatever I support it.

There is nothing more dazzling than fearless and revoltionariy minds. 

Beautiful sister, desirable woman, quintessence of a revolutionary woman, ne plus ultra of the new rebel breed - if I didn’t take you into my heart, and if I didn’t find myself loving you, and if this love wasn’t as easy and natural as breathing, there would be something very wrong with me.

George Jackson (via awomansplaceisinthestruggle)

George, wow, let it go!

(via paintmeblack)

blunthought:

Seale & Newton.

Newton was definitely one of the most attractive men in the whole fucking history of humanity, up there with Sankara !!!!!!!! *_*
OMG Look at all this freshness, he looks so fucking hot in the crispy white shirt and the black leather jacket.  An amazing soul in a beautiful envelope.
Bobby Seale UGH (¬_¬) No comment!

blunthought:

Seale & Newton.

Newton was definitely one of the most attractive men in the whole fucking history of humanity, up there with Sankara !!!!!!!! *_*

OMG Look at all this freshness, he looks so fucking hot in the crispy white shirt and the black leather jacket.  An amazing soul in a beautiful envelope.

Bobby Seale UGH (¬_¬) No comment!

livefromthenypl:

Today, in 1972, Angela Davis was acquitted of charges for conspiracy, murder and kidnapping after being accused of supplying weapons to Jonathan Jackson. While in jail, fellow civil rights activists and Black Panther Party members rallied for her release: 
Davis came to LIVE in October of 2010 for one of our biggest landmark events to talk with Toni Morrison about the importance of libraries.
ANGELA DAVIS: I was in jail in New York—I don’t know, did you mention that I was in jail? Some people don’t know. And one of the first places I went, I was able to go, in the jail was the library, and I didn’t see very many interesting books there, all right? I mean, I had just finished my studies in philosophy, and I went to the library expecting something very different, so what I did was I had people send books to me when I was there, and I wanted to share those books with all of the other women, there was something like a thousand women there. I was not allowed to do that. As a matter of fact, in the library there was a big cardboard box.
I could receive the books and I could read the books myself. It was okay for me read them, but don’t share them. And one of them was George Jackson’s book, Soledad Brothers, that was not allowed at all, although we did—you know, one of the things I learned when I was in jail there was how to secrete certain kinds of things, so we were able to—so we had these clandestine reading groups with books that were smuggled out of that box in the library, and it kind of reminded me of Frederick Douglass and Frederick Douglass’s effort to get an education, to learn how to read, and his idea that education really was liberation.
Watch/listen to the event here… and watch the short here…

livefromthenypl:

Today, in 1972, Angela Davis was acquitted of charges for conspiracy, murder and kidnapping after being accused of supplying weapons to Jonathan Jackson. While in jail, fellow civil rights activists and Black Panther Party members rallied for her release:
Photo Credit: Creative Commons/Nick DeWolf Photo Archive 

Davis came to LIVE in October of 2010 for one of our biggest landmark events to talk with Toni Morrison about the importance of libraries.

ANGELA DAVIS: I was in jail in New York—I don’t know, did you mention that I was in jail? Some people don’t know. And one of the first places I went, I was able to go, in the jail was the library, and I didn’t see very many interesting books there, all right? I mean, I had just finished my studies in philosophy, and I went to the library expecting something very different, so what I did was I had people send books to me when I was there, and I wanted to share those books with all of the other women, there was something like a thousand women there. I was not allowed to do that. As a matter of fact, in the library there was a big cardboard box.

I could receive the books and I could read the books myself. It was okay for me read them, but don’t share them. And one of them was George Jackson’s book, Soledad Brothers, that was not allowed at all, although we did—you know, one of the things I learned when I was in jail there was how to secrete certain kinds of things, so we were able to—so we had these clandestine reading groups with books that were smuggled out of that box in the library, and it kind of reminded me of Frederick Douglass and Frederick Douglass’s effort to get an education, to learn how to read, and his idea that education really was liberation.

Watch/listen to the event here… and watch the short here…

(via faysbook)

aphoticoccurrences:

Toyin Odutola

Wow, Toyin is SO TALENTED, this piece is amazing. 

aphoticoccurrences:

Toyin Odutola

Wow, Toyin is SO TALENTED, this piece is amazing. 

fyeahblackhistory:

blackmanonthemoon:

Found it and watching it on youtube

Click here for the Video

The first minutes of this movie are intense!!

fyeahblackhistory:

blackmanonthemoon:

Found it and watching it on youtube

Click here for the Video

The first minutes of this movie are intense!!

(via diasporicroots)

babylonfalling:

04/06/68 - Lil’ Bobby Hutton murdered in cold blood by Oakland police.

The first one out was Bobby Hutton.
He emerged, his hands in the air, from a burning tear-gassed basement where eight of his Black Panther brothers were still holed up. He stepped into the bright searchlight. Oakland police shot him dead.
Bobby James Hutton, Black Panther treasurer, is now a martyr of the fight for black freedom. If he had survived the seven shots that shattered his life, Bobby Hutton would have been 18 years old this month.

Click here for the coverage of the incident from the legendary Bay Area underground newspaper, Berkeley Barb.

Litle Bobby Hutton, little panther.

babylonfalling:

04/06/68 - Lil’ Bobby Hutton murdered in cold blood by Oakland police.

The first one out was Bobby Hutton.

He emerged, his hands in the air, from a burning tear-gassed basement where eight of his Black Panther brothers were still holed up. He stepped into the bright searchlight. Oakland police shot him dead.

Bobby James Hutton, Black Panther treasurer, is now a martyr of the fight for black freedom. If he had survived the seven shots that shattered his life, Bobby Hutton would have been 18 years old this month.

Click here for the coverage of the incident from the legendary Bay Area underground newspaper, Berkeley Barb.

Litle Bobby Hutton, little panther.

(via loveisthewateroflife)

lalie:

theatlantic:

Illinois Rep. Bobby Rush took the symbol of the Trayvon Martin protests from the street to the Capitol on Wednesday, getting ejected from the House floor for wearing a hoodie.
Read more at The Atlantic Wire.

For those who don’t know, Rep. Rush’s district includes the southside of Chicago, a heavily black area that sees a lot of violence and very few city resources.
The City of Chicago as a whole has already reached 100 homicides for the year, the majority of which are young black men. [See: The RedEye’s Chicago Homicide Map]
TL;DR: This is important.

When I see this, I remember that he was once a panther.

lalie:

theatlantic:

Illinois Rep. Bobby Rush took the symbol of the Trayvon Martin protests from the street to the Capitol on Wednesday, getting ejected from the House floor for wearing a hoodie.

Read more at The Atlantic Wire.

For those who don’t know, Rep. Rush’s district includes the southside of Chicago, a heavily black area that sees a lot of violence and very few city resources.

The City of Chicago as a whole has already reached 100 homicides for the year, the majority of which are young black men. [See: The RedEye’s Chicago Homicide Map]

TL;DR: This is important.

When I see this, I remember that he was once a panther.

(via ethiopienne)

:o
*reaches for lubricant* 

:o

*reaches for lubricant* 

(via loveisthewateroflife)

babylonfalling:

Black Panther Curtis Powell arrested in the LES as part of the NY Panther 21 frame up. Photo by Roz Payne (1969).

We wouldn’t bomb a jive store like Macy’s because we’d kill our own people—poor people.


I thought it was Fred Hampton

babylonfalling:

Black Panther Curtis Powell arrested in the LES as part of the NY Panther 21 frame up. Photo by Roz Payne (1969).

We wouldn’t bomb a jive store like Macy’s because we’d kill our own people—poor people.

I thought it was Fred Hampton

(via black-culture)

18-15n-77-30w:

http://18-15n-77-30w.tumblr.com/
streetetiquette:

Black Ivy Panther 
source 

streetetiquette:

Black Ivy Panther 

source 

(via emmetttrill)

grrlpower:

The Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975, Stokely Carmichael

My hero!!

Black skin IS jail within white supremacy.

(via revolutionary-afrolatino)

blunthought:

Ten Point Program of the Black Panther Party:

1. We want freedom. We want power to determine the destiny of our Black and oppressed communities.

2. We want full employment for our people.

3. We want an end to the robbery by the capitalists of our Black and oppressed communities.

4. We want decent housing, fit for the shelter of human beings.

5. We want decent education for our people that exposes the true nature of this decadent American society. We want education that teaches us our true history and our role in the present-day society.

6. We want completely free health care for all Black and oppressed people.

7. We want an immediate end for police brutality and murder of Black people, other people of color, all oppressed people inside the United States.

8. We want an immediate end to all wars of aggression.

9. We want freedom for all Black and oppressed people now held in U.S. federal, state, county, city, and military prisons and jails. We want trials by a jury of peers for all persons charged with so-called crimes under the laws of this country.


10. We want land, bread, housing, education, clothing, justice, peace, and people’s community control of modern technology.

blunthought:

Ten Point Program of the Black Panther Party:

1. We want freedom. We want power to determine the destiny of our Black and oppressed communities.

2. We want full employment for our people.

3. We want an end to the robbery by the capitalists of our Black and oppressed communities.

4. We want decent housing, fit for the shelter of human beings.


5. We want decent education for our people that exposes the true nature of this decadent American society. We want education that teaches us our true history and our role in the present-day society.


6. We want completely free health care for all Black and oppressed people.


7. We want an immediate end for police brutality and murder of Black people, other people of color, all oppressed people inside the United States.


8. We want an immediate end to all wars of aggression.


9. We want freedom for all Black and oppressed people now held in U.S. federal, state, county, city, and military prisons and jails. We want trials by a jury of peers for all persons charged with so-called crimes under the laws of this country.

10. We want land, bread, housing, education, clothing, justice, peace, and people’s community control of modern technology.

(via revolutionary-afrolatino)