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posts tagged "quote"

There has always been racism. But it developed as a leading principle of thought and perception in the context of colonialism. That’s understandable. When you have your boot on someone’s neck, you have to justify it. The justification has to be their depravity. It’s very striking to see this in the case of people who aren’t very different from one another. Take a look at the British conquest of Ireland, the earliest of the Western colonial conquests. It was described in the same terms as the conquest of Africa. The Irish were a different race. They weren’t human. They weren’t like us. We had to crush and destroy them. No. It has to do with conquest, with oppression. If you’re robbing somebody, oppressing them, dictating their lives, it’s a very rare person who can say: “Look, I’m a monster. I’m doing this for my own good.” Even Himmler didn’t say that. A standard technique of belief formation goes along with oppression, whether it’s throwing them in gas chambers or charging them too much at a corner store, or anything in between. The standard reaction is to say:‘It’s their depravity. That’s why I’m doing it. Maybe I’m even doing them good.’ If it’s their depravity, there’s got to be something about them that makes them different from me. What’s different about them will be whatever you can find.

Noam Chomsky (via noam-chomsky)

دیگران را ببخش، نه به خاطر اینکه لایق بخششند، به خاطر اینکه تو لایق آرامشی
Forgive others, not because they deserve forgiveness, but because you deserve peace.

دیگران را ببخش، نه به خاطر اینکه لایق بخششند، به خاطر اینکه تو لایق آرامشی

Forgive others, not because they deserve forgiveness, but because you deserve peace.

(via thepeacefulterrorist)

Many seek to know the laws of existence that they might influence its course. True mastery lies in the surrender to its spontaneity.

Almine (via elige)

SURRENDER

(via elige)

Perhaps the most important thing we have to remember about the black tradition is that Africa and its diaspora are much older than blackness. Blackness does not come from Africa. Rather, Africa and its diaspora become black at a particular stage in their history. It sounds a little strange to put it this way, but the truth of this description is widely acknowledged. Blackness is an adjunct to racial slavery.

Bryan Wagner, Disturbing the Peace, p. 1.
»thefactofblackness. (via tobia)

This is a given but I am still startled by the number of black people seeking refuge  and identity in the gross fabrication that is blackness, a remain of racial slavery.

(via tobia)

If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original.

Sir Ken Robinson (via tobia)

(via tobia)

It’s psychologically painful. Acknowledging such things would mean acknowledging the humanity of black folks. Acknowledging the humanity of black folks would mean acknowledging the gross injustice they are subjected to on a daily basis, with the complicit, implicit, and explicit support of the entire (white) population. Acknowledging support of that gross injustice would mean acknowledging personal responsibility. Truly acknowledging personal responsibility for the mistreatment of another human being is one of the most painful experiences an individual can have.

And there’s an entire system that is built to give Whites the option not to acknowledge any of this and avoid said pain. We have the option of putting a personal moment of discomfort over another person’s lifetime of difficulty, and taught that the former is a completely reasonable and justified route to take. We are taught that taking the latter path is traitorous, naive, and unfair. We are taught that compassion towards people of other races is weakness, if it doesn’t jive with the White consensus concerning “appropriate” levels of interracial compassion. We are told that our compassion will be taken advantage of, that it will be used to hurt us. We are told that, when the roles are “reversed”, people of other races will act at least as selfishly as we have (and that this justifies our behavior). We are encouraged to “protect” ourselves from this. I’m sure you can guess where this fear comes from. Each tenant is internalized over the course of a lifetime of small experiences.

Very little of this is explicitly communicated (overt racism is demonized in White culture). In fact, the vast majority of explicit messages concerning interracial affairs are pro-equality, pro-diversity, and multi-culturally positive. This is the core of the issue. Subtle racist behavior is coupled at an early age with positive labels. By the time a White kid reaches the teen years, they’re already well-equipped to think like a racist and talk/act like they’re not one, and vice versa (simultaneously, in most cases). I talk a lot about a societally cultivated lack of self-awareness. It’s not a joke. It’s the product of a White Supremacist culture being suddenly forced underground and desperately hidden from other Whites, to whom Whites feel they are held most accountable.

I’ll summarize: Whites can choose at any time to start treating the rest of the world like equals. But they sincerely believe they already are. In White culture, that is all the justification one needs.

foxtalbotnegatives' answer to the question “is it physically painful to acknowledge & respect the contributions of black people to American culture?”

This is brilliant.

Don’t be in a hurry to condemn because he doesn’t do what you do or think as you think or as fast. There was a time when you didn’t know what you know today.

Malcolm X  (via elige)

(via weareallafricans)

motherjones:

“But dear God, we should not be putting civil rights issues to a popular vote to be subject to the sentiments, the passions of the day. No minority should have their rights subject to the passions and sentiments of the majority. This is a fundamental bedrock of what our nation stands for.”

Chris Christie, check your gay-marriage milkshake. Cory Booker just drank it.

Five minutes well spent.

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

We have anti-choice women in for abortions all the time. Many of them are just naive and ignorant until they find themselves with an unwanted pregnancy. Many of them are not malicious. They just haven’t given it the proper amount of thought until it completely affects them. They can be judgmental about their friends, family, and other women. Then suddenly they become pregnant. Suddenly they see the truth. That it should only be their own choice. Unfortunately, many also think that somehow they are different than everyone else and they deserve to have an abortion, while no one else does.

occupyonline:

Fox News: Rich people paying Rich people to tell Middle Class people to blame Poor people.
dashboardchat:

and the sheep eat it up for breakfast, lunch, and dinner!

occupyonline:

Fox News: Rich people paying Rich people to tell Middle Class people to blame Poor people.

dashboardchat:

and the sheep eat it up for breakfast, lunch, and dinner!

(via occupyonline)

Black people can’t talk to white people about race anymore. There’s really nothing left to say. There are libraries full of books, interviews, essays, lectures, and symposia. If people want to learn about their own country and its history, it is not incumbent on black people to talk to them about it. It is not our responsibility to educate them about it. Plus whenever white people want to talk about race, they never want to talk about themselves. There needs to be discussion among people who think of themselves as white. They need to unpack that language, that history, that social position and see what it really offers them, and what it takes away from them.


The Negro artist works against an undertow of sharp criticism and misunderstanding from his own group and unintentional bribes from the whites. “O, be respectable, write about nice people, show how good we are,” say the Negroes. “Be stereotyped, don’t go too far, don’t shatter our illusions about you, don’t amuse us too seriously. We will pay you,” say the whites. 
Langston Hughes; an excerpt from The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain, published June 23, 1926

The Negro artist works against an undertow of sharp criticism and misunderstanding from his own group and unintentional bribes from the whites. “O, be respectable, write about nice people, show how good we are,” say the Negroes. “Be stereotyped, don’t go too far, don’t shatter our illusions about you, don’t amuse us too seriously. We will pay you,” say the whites.

Langston Hughes; an excerpt from The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain, published June 23, 1926

(via note-a-bear)